Reluctant to play ball, a boy stands to side; dad scans horizon

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Dads enjoy watching sons at a regular Tuesday evening Trail Life USA gathering in Chattanooga.

Dads enjoy watching sons at a regular Tuesday evening Trail Life USA gathering in  Chattanooga under a wildly white-striped sky.

By David Tulis

Tuesday nights at my house is Trail Life USA, a new and morally honest alternative to the Boy Scouts. We have dinner early, and head off to Clear Creek Church of Christ for the meeting. The host assembles in a conference room next to the gym for announcements, prayer, a brief devotional led by Ben Fisher, an homeschooling engineer. The requisite honorifics are put forth, with a federal government flag presented; all but one of us recite a pledge of allegiance to that flag “and to the republic, for which it stands.”

The Tulis boy, a member of Trial Life, is 11. He tugs at me to leave just as a kickball game gets under way in the ballfield behind the church. “Dad, let’s go. I don’t know anything about kickball or baseball,” he pleads. “Your team is out in the field, now,” I say. But he hangs back. He doesn’t want to learn himself anything about these, either. “Dad, you know I don’t care about sports. They are a waste of time.” I hold out as he trudges off toward the car, trying to draw me away from a conversation with another boy’s grandfather. He comes back, finally, defeated, and waits on the side.

We leave as the game continues as the sun sets, the sky striped with jet billows. The air smells fresh with a hint of honeysuckle, and the men are friendly enough. One of the dads pulls me aside and asks me a survey question from his Sunday school class to this effect: “What in your life as a Christian are evidences of your transformation in Christ or occasions of it?” My answer: A care for the law of God, a rising care for other people (other-centric orientation) and marriage, which changes a man’s perspective and gives him opportunity to live out Christ’s obedient life in an intimate setting, until death. Since he is making notes, I keep the answers succinct.

The boy, eager to escape, endures two brief conversations I enjoy with men before we depart — dad’s elevator pitches for a business project. On the way home, we are waylayed by the need to shop for a birthday card and treats for brother who graduated with the homeschool class of 2014 Saturday and is turning 18.

Hazy skies

Earlier in the day I’d interviewed a scientist in Dalton, Ga. Walter H. Carter is an environmental investigator, consultant and building scientist with EAQP Inc. I ask about how he would test for high levels of aluminum, barium and strontium in the air over Chattanooga. After hearing my interest in geoengineering, he explains how he would first obtain public records of these pollutants, then design a series of air tests that might reveal the breathable offal sprayed into the sky over the city by scores of jets.

Tuesday is the second day in a row of heavy aircraft flyover and a laying down by engines or nozzles the persistent, muddy mist that now characterizes the horizon over my hometown. None of the men and boys tossing about on the soft grass pay the slightest mind to the bizarre trailwork in the skies overhead.

Mr. Carter says such a test would cost between F$10,000 and F$20,000 and may not provide anything conclusive.

What do you think about what your eyes see? Trace the course of the day as I, with a tiny Canon Powershot camera record the phenomenon of sky striping — geoengineering, it’s called. The program is intended to change the atmosphere, to inject a layer of metallic skin into the upper atmosphere to reduce direct sunlight. Industry and other programs have reduced by 22 percent already the sunlight reaching the earth’s surface.

Environmentalists and researchers such as Dane Wigington propose that the increase in the planet’s temperature is caused by this decades-old program of chemtrailing, and the attendant violence in weather, from storms to drought to floods — hapless byproducts of a know-no-limits pride among scientists, climate control companies, government and a financial industry that has grown up around futures markets dependent on weather.

Why the photographic record?

The photos below should disabuse you of one notion: That persistent jet exhaust trails are mere contrails caused by cold, moist air being sucked through hot jet engines and forming condensate. Below you will see sky stripes start and stop. These stripes are not innocent and harmless happenstance results of regular jet traffic.

Tuesday’s — and today’s — air traffic has a high goal. Geoengineering is a federal climate control program to save planet earth from the results of industrial and Western civilizational pollution. It is, hence, a form of sanctioned and official pollution, whose effect on human health is not a matter of concern to the quiet operators of sky stripers, operating under military supervision.

What do you suppose are the implications of these program on local economy?

David Tulis is married, the father of four home educated children, and a deacon at Brainerd Hills Presbyterian Church in Chattanooga.

For your review

Murky brilliance; 2 days of chemtrailing muzzy city’s skies

Are sky stripes over city lost jets, or stepped-up geoengineering program?

Bizarre March blizzard follows day of heavy chemtrailing in Chattanooga skies

Tuesday, May 20, 2014, is a second day of heavy sky striping over Hamilton County, Tenn., home of Chattanooga, the so-called River City.

Tuesday, May 20, 2014, is a second day of heavy sky striping over Hamilton County, Tenn., home of Chattanooga, the so-called River City.

Aerosolized metallic ingredients in the 10 micron range are deposited from jets. Here, a trail turns into a cloud, which adds to the region's hazy white lasting all day May 20, 2014, over Chattanooga.

Aerosolized metallic ingredients in the 10 micron range are deposited from jets. Here, a trail turns into a cloud, which adds to the region’s hazy white lasting all day May 20, 2014, over Chattanooga.

A Tulis boy endures playing kickball, a game like baseball he insists he doesn't understand. We play under a violently jet-striped sky at a church field in Hixson, north of the Tennessee River from Chattanooga proper.

A Tulis boy endures playing kickball, a game like baseball he insists he doesn’t understand. We play under a violently jet-striped sky at a church field in Hixson, north of the Tennessee River from Chattanooga proper.

This photo and those below show a sequence in which a jet pilot starts his legal emission. See right.

This photo and those below show a sequence in which a jet pilot starts his legal emission. See right.

140520 Crossing trails

 

Might we attribute this gap in coverage to variations in the moisture of the air? Maybe.

Might we attribute this gap in coverage to variations in the moisture of the air? Maybe.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Understanding that these overflights are not regular bus — or airline — traffic will instill in us confidence in the U.S. government we might have lost. Let’s be patriotic, thankful and proud of the old homeland.

Understanding that these overflights are not regular bus — or airline — traffic will instill in us confidence in the U.S. government we might have lost. Let’s be patriotic, thankful and proud of the old homeland.

Chemtrails dissipate over the Hixson part of Chattanooga May 20, 2014, a day in which perhaps hundreds of trails were spread over the city.

Chemtrails dissipate over the Hixson part of Chattanooga May 20, 2014, a day in which perhaps hundreds of trails were spread over the city.

A geoengineered evening sky sits before a mirror and adjusts its mascara and eye liner before night falls May 20, 2014, in Chattanooga.

A geoengineered evening sky sits before a mirror and adjusts its mascara and eye liner before night falls May 20, 2014, in Chattanooga.

The day began bright and white with chemtrails such as this one over my house in north Hamilton County. The next day, May 21, looks much the same, full of white stripes and a dull muzzy haze covering the horizon from the Tulis house in Soddy-Daisy, north of Chattanooga.

The day began bright and white with chemtrails such as this one over my house in north Hamilton County. The next day, May 21, looks much the same, full of white stripes and a dull muzzy haze covering the horizon from the Tulis house in Soddy-Daisy, north of Chattanooga.

One Response

  1. Ross Marsden May 25, 2014 Reply

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