Scientist ‘terrified’ by prospect of aerial program already in effect over cities

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Jets pour white emissions into a sky in Germany March 6, 2013, in a program that promises to solve what is said to be a global arming crisis. (Photo Facebook)

Jets pour white emissions into a sky in Germany March 6, 2013, in a program that promises to solve what is said to be a global warming crisis. (Photo Facebook)

White jet plumes are not new. What may be innocuous condensation trails in this 1969 photo have graduated to emissions to serve national military policy. (Photo Facebook)

White jet plumes are not new. What may be innocuous condensation trails in this 1969 photo have been repurposed to serve environmental and military policy. (Photo Facebook)

Jet stripes intersect over skies of North Mississippi. While some emissions seem like mere dumpings over an area, others appear coordinated. (Photo Sharon White on Facebook)

Jet stripes intersect over skies of North Mississippi. While some emissions seem like offhand dumps, others appear coordinated. (Photo Sharon White on Facebook)

Aluminum pounded down to the size of nanoparticulate floats aloft in the nation's important climate control program. Often, the bank of particles create "chembos" such as this one. (Photo Facebook)

Aluminum pounded down to the size of nanoparticulate floats aloft in the nation’s important climate control program. Often, the bank of particles create “chembos” such as this one. (Photo Facebook)

Geoengineers debate planetary effects of chemtrailing as a proposed remedy for global warming. But rarely do they give thought to  neurological damage of nanoparticulates on the health of boys. (Photo posted by Brian Headey on Facebook)

Geoengineers debate planetary effects of chemtrailing as a proposed remedy for global warming. But rarely do they give thought to neurological damage of nanoparticulates on the health of boys. (Photo posted by Brian Headey on Facebook from friend careless of sky striping oddity.)

The global phenomenon of chemtrailing has escalated in the past two years. Paris celebrates. (Photo Serge Robert Jassogne on Facebook)

The global phenomenon of chemtrailing has escalated in the past two years. Paris celebrates. (Photo Serge Robert Jassogne on Facebook)

Buffalo, N.Y., gets gassy fur Nov. 11, 2014, in its stratosphere a week before a big snow dump. (Photo Facebook)

Buffalo, N.Y., gets gassy fur coat Nov. 11, 2014, in its stratosphere a week before a big snow dump. (Photo Facebook)

Jets stripes blanket Fresno, Calif. (Photo Matthew Banwart on Facebook)

Jets stripes blanket Fresno, Calif. (Photo Matthew Banwart on Facebook)

Metal particulate in the sky is sometimes so bright it casts sideways and upward shadows on freshly laid sky plumes. (Photo Facebook)

Metal particulate in the sky is sometimes so bright it casts sideways and upward shadows on freshly laid sky plumes. (Photo Facebook)

Routine jet traffic over western Massachussetts? (Photo Denis Leduc on Facebook)

Sky stripes become clouds. Routine jet traffic over western Massachussetts? (Photo Denis Leduc on Facebook)

While some smoky trailwork seems careless, jets sometimes care about precision in the laying of their licensed air pollution, as seen over Pennsylvania. (Photo Aundriea Sharpe)

While some smoky trailwork seems hapless, jets sometimes are made to be precise in the laying of their licensed airborne particles, as seen over Pennsylvania. (Photo Aundriea Sharpe)

Weather forecasters call such skies "partly cloudy." (Photo Facebook)

Weather forecasters call such skies “partly cloudy.” (Photo Facebook)

Policy skies such as this in Frimley, UK, tell us that national governments are way ahead of university geoengineering grandees and their F$8 million studies. (Photo Grant Wood on Facebook)

Policy skies such as this in Frimley, UK, tell us that national governments are way ahead of university geoengineering grandees and their F$8 million studies. (Photo Grant Wood on Facebook)

Bizarre shadows mark a November sky as jet muzzy up a blue sky. (Photo Chris Kosabucki on Facebook)

Bizarre shadows mark a November sky as jets muzzy up the blue. I have photographed similar scenes over Chattanooga. (Photo Chris Kosabucki on Facebook)

A muck of clouds — possibly from the hand of nature itself — is rippled by jet trails in this photo posted by USA Today from the Texas Panhandle. (Photo Elizabeth Williams-Cox)

A muck of clouds — possibly from the hand of nature itself — is rippled by jet trails in this photo posted by USA Today from the Texas Panhandle. (Photo Elizabeth Williams-Cox)

Sky-snuffing trails such as these over France come from jet fuel modified to create clouds or from jets with internal tanks that spray pressurized particulate from wing and fuselage nozzles. (Photo from French antigeoengineering petition website)

Sky-snuffing trails such as these over France come from jet fuel modified to create clouds or from jet tanks spraying pressurized particulate from wing and fuselage nozzles. (Photo from French antigeoengineering petition website)

Knoxville, like Chattanooga, is smothered Election Day, Nov. 4, 2014. (Photo Marla Stair-Wood of Tennessee Sky Watch) https://www.facebook.com/TennesseeSkywatch

Knoxville, like Chattanooga, is smothered Election Day, Nov. 4, 2014. (Photo Marla Stair-Wood of Tennessee Sky Watch

Sky striping is called a "negative emission" because, as official pollution, it counteracts the fumes of coal-burning steam plants and autos. (Photo John Brinsko on Facebook)

Sky striping is called a “negative emission” because, as official white pollution, it counteracts the black fumes of coal-burning steam plants and autos. (Photo John Brinsko on Facebook)

A jet hastens across the sky in Northeast England. (Photo Sean Cairney of SkyWatch-Northeast-England-UK-Geoengineered-and-Haarped-Skies on Facebook)

A jet hastens across the sky in Northeast England. (Photo Sean Cairney of SkyWatch-Northeast-England-UK-Geoengineered-and-Haarped-Skies on Facebook)

This closeup of the jet in the previous photo suggests an emission that is not a mere jet exhaust. Notice how the plume flows sideways. (Photo Sean Cairney of SkyWatch-Northeast-England-UK-Geoengineered-and-Haarped-Skies on Facebook)

This closeup of the jet in the previous photo suggests an emission that is not a mere jet exhaust. Notice how the plume flows sideways. (Photo Sean Cairney of SkyWatch-Northeast-England-UK-Geoengineered-and-Haarped-Skies on Facebook)

Cloud systems often are manipulated by government-run ionosphere heaters, as may be these in Romania. (Photo Facebook)

Cloud systems often are manipulated by government-run ionosphere heaters, as may be these in Romania. (Photo Facebook)

Chemtrailing is way ahead of academia, which proposes chemtrailing to help dim the sun. It's already happening over Virginia Beach. (Photo Facebook)

Chemtrailing is way ahead of academia, which proposes chemtrailing to help dim the sun. It’s already happening over Virginia Beach. (Photo Facebook)

A Fox weather forecaster named Paul Dellegato posts photos such as this one and sees nothing out of the ordinary. Notice the light refraction. (Photo Justin Battles on Facebook)

A Fox TV weather forecaster, Paul Dellegato, posts photos such as this one and sees nothing out of the ordinary. Notice the light refraction, aka “chembo.” (Photo Justin Battles on Facebook)

Bizarre effects accompany mankind's manipulation of rainfall and sunlight. (Photo Dave Richter on Facebook)
Bizarre effects accompany mankind’s manipulation of rainfall and sunlight. (Photo Dave Richter on Facebook)

Chattanooga is heavily treated Nov. 16, so bountifully that chembos popped up, as seen from Soddy-Daisy.

Chattanooga is heavily treated Nov. 16, so bountifully that chembos glimmer into a view from Soddy-Daisy.

A chemtrail hangs high over a veterans park in my hometown, Soddy-Daisy, Tenn.

A chemtrail hangs high over a veterans park in my hometown, Soddy-Daisy, Tenn. Should we salute?

This pattern is common when jets dump aerosolized particulate into the sky to create clouds. This shot from San Diego. (Photo Gregory May on Facebook)

This pattern is common when jets dump aerosolized particulate into the sky to create clouds. This shot from San Diego. (Photo Gregory May on Facebook)

C. Michael Radford, who lives near Santea Fe, N.M., has taken remarkable sky striping photos such as this one.

C. Michael Radford, who lives near Santea Fe, N.M., has taken remarkable sky striping photos such as this one.

Media coverage over stratospheric aerosol geoengineering explodes this week in the Western press.Media coverage over stratospheric aerosol geoengineering explodes this week in the Western press.

Everyone knows how laborious the usual method is of attaining to arts and sciences; whereas by his contrivance [a 40-handled device that arbitrarily combines words], the most ignorant person at a reasonable charge, and with little bodily labour, may write books in philosophy, poetry, politics, law, mathematics and theology without the least assistance from genius or study.

— Gulliver’s visit to the academy of projectors in Lagado, capital of Laputa,
in Jonathan Swift’s Gulliver’s Travels, Part III, 1726

By David Tulis

A persistent program to dim sunlight over Hamilton County, Tenn., is part of a global effort to give national governments control over weather, a scheme well under way even though academic literature and the press describe the program as theoretical and prospective, an “unproven science.”

Over Chattanooga heavy jet traffic is the norm, with overflights’ emission trails creating milky white haze that dims the sun. The treatments come roughly every other day. Thus far this month of Thanksgiving, white tattoos traced city skies Nov. 2-4, 7, 8, 10, 14, 15, 19, 22, 24-26.

This week two sides of the weather control story snapped together to make a point — like molars from two jaws, as if to say: “Man must slash unhealthy emissions from the ground and he must increase healthy emissions aloft to stop ‘climate change.’”

➤ The U.S. environmental protection agency announced it plans to impose upon states tougher air pollution standards from 75 parts per billion to 60 parts per billion, part of a program by the federal government and the people behind it to deindustrialize national economy. Control of ground pollutants are Part A of a global agenda.

➤ Part B of climate control by nation-states is the use of heavy industrial equipment — jet fuel modifications and stratospheric aerosol spraying by airborne fleets — to wrest control of storms, drought, the deeps and sunlight itself from the hazards of nature — the free market of nature, if you will.

Climate fixes ‘could harm billions’

The program over my hometown — and yours, too? — is evidence of a climate fix that is well ahead of the public discourse. On Nov. 26 are published stories in the American press about EPA’s proposal for stricter ozone air pollution standards. On the same day the press in Britain carries stories about Bristol University professor Matthew Watson’s remarks about “terrifying” prospects for a mass chemtrailing program. The pouring into the sky of what’s called “negative emissions” is in the end the optimal form of geoengineering and weather modification when rated against other — and seemingly fruity — alternatives. These ideas are only slightly less woolly than those in Gulliver’s Travels’ school of wacky projectors, where one scholar labors to “reduce human excrement to its original food” and another seeks to extract sunbeams from cucumbers.

Three universities — Leeds, Bristol and Oxford — in F$8.5 million studies say stratospheric aerosol geoengineering or sag has potential downsides that are “really, really complicated,” Mr. Watson says. “We don’t like the idea but we’re more convinced than ever that we have to research it,” he says. “ ***Personally I find this stuff terrifying but we have to compare it to doing nothing, to business-as-usual leading us to a world with a 4 [degree celsius] rise.

“We are sleepwalking to a disaster with climate change,” he says. “Cutting emissions is undoubtedly the thing we should be focusing on but it seems to be failing. Although geoengineering is terrifying to many people, and I include myself in this, [its feasibility and safety] are questions that have to be answered.”

Solar radiation management is the bureaucratic term for the nearly daily activity over Chattanooga and Hamilton County. The three universities used computer models to project how proposed chemtrailing and other programs to make deserts, cities, seas and skies more reflective so that incoming solar radiation is blocked from reaching the surface of the earth.

The media coverage are effectively a bringing from the margin of public discourse and putting proposed chemtrailing at the center, if only as a theoretical. “Ideas include aircraft spraying out sulphur particles at high altitude to mimic the cooling effect of volcanoes or using artificial ‘trees’ to absorb CO2,” BBC reports. “Long regarded as the most bizarre of all solutions for global warming, ideas for geo-engineering have come in for more scrutiny in recent years as international efforts to limit carbon emissions have failed.”

Fruitcake proposals are considered to deflect sunlight in an ostensible effort to “cool the planet.” This graphic is from a British university study.

Fruitcake proposals are considered to deflect sunlight in an ostensible effort to “cool the planet.” Chemtrailing, upper right, is probably the most practical. This graphic is from a British university study.

Next to fruity proposals, chemtrailing sane

Chemtrailing could ruin the lives of billions not by the emissions as a inhalable and ingestible pollutant, but by altering the weather — the very goal itself of the program as it’s described. Billions of people would be affected by SRM projects that reduced global temperatures but worsened floods and droughts for up to 65 percent of the world’s people.

➤ Spraying sulphate particles high into the atmosphere to block the sun “adversely affected 2.8 billion souls.

➤ In the fruitcake gallery of ideas, spraying salt water over oceans to “whiten low clouds *** adversely affected 3 billion people.”

➤ Thinning high cirrus clouds to allow more heat to escape the earth hurt 2.4 billion souls, generating “microbubbles on the ocean surface to whiten it” hurt 2 billion. “Covering all deserts in shiny material” hurt 4.1 billion people. “Growing shinier crops” hurt 1.4 billion.

Some of these ideas are used in a University of Leeds graphic above.

“We have found,” says Professor Piers Forster of Leeds University, “that between 1.2 and 4.1 billion people could be adversely affected by changes in rainfall patterns. he most striking example of a downside would be the complete drying-out of the Sahel region of Africa — that would be very difficult to adapt to for those substantial populations — and that happens across all the scenarios.” Chemtrailing could profoundly disrupt the Indian Monsoon, the authors indicated, and reduce rainfall in the tropics by 30 percent.

Snuffing smokestacks better than aerosol emissions

The scientists say a surer way to save the planet is deindustrialization of the kind proposed this week by EPA, an aggravation against liberty and the free market. The loftier intervention of chemtrailing is opposed in some quarters because it allows governments and peoples a way to avoid the tough choices of shutting down factories and coal-burning power plants and making cars too expensive for common people to run. Despite the dangers of sag upon rain patterns, the studies’ authors “believe that research should continue just in case runaway warming leaves no other options,” BBC says.

“People decry solar radiation management as a band-aid,” Professor Steve Rayner of Oxford University says, “but band-aids can be useful for healing.” The IPCC, or intergovernmental panel on climate change, in a recent report says all options should be considered.

Chattanooga ill effects?

Stratospheric aerosol geoengineering has put a sag in cloud cover over Chattanooga for months. Aerosolized emissions are spread at 40,000 feet, well over most ordinary cloud cover, and the sky seems to hang so low one loses any sense of depth to the sky. It’s as if we lived under a white rug pulled over the city, so bright that even distant clumps of cumulus clouds are barely visible for lack of contrast. Sky striping is not new. I photographed one intense distribution Nov. 14, 2002, and took 1-hour developed photos to a newsroom colleague, John Coniglio, in charge of photo department that day, to ask if the aerial activity were not a news event (it isn’t, he said). So we could say the city has been subjected to negative emissions at least 12 years.

But the program has intensified by my guess over the past two years. Every reading by the Chattanooga Hamilton County Air Pollution Control Bureau contains aluminum, strontium and barium, ingredients that figure in many aerial geoengineering patents. Our local pollution watchdog does not bark because he is given no statutory authority to care a whit about this cocktail of breathable and ingestible metallic elements.

The problem for local economy is upon the point of health. Aluminum is found in higher concentrations in the brains of Alzheimer’s patients (Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease online, Vol. 35, No. 1, 2013). There is growing concern that aluminum is involved in the development of this devastating condition (Clinical Biochemistry, January 2013). Alzheimer’s, a neurodegenerative condition linked to metals poisoning and other environmental causes, is the No. 6 cause of death in 2013, the Tennessee Department of health says. In 2005, Tennessee was ranked No. 1 in the nation for Alzheimer’s disease deaths. Hamilton County was the only metropolitan area of Tennessee where Alzheimer’s disease ranked in the top five leading causes of death instead of accidents, according to a 2010 health report.

The lococentrism and love of hometown such as that expressed on the Benwood Foundation “community voices” blog looks like so much pitiable preciosity in light of a global program exercised here with no care of human health.

California researcher Dane Wigington prompted an exchange that suggests how slight human health concerns are when one has a duty to save the planet. Harvard geoengineering theoretician David Keith dismisses the activist’s health fusspotting during a 2010 lecture Q&A you can watch YouTube.

Let me be more careful here… to separate out the toxicological crux. The aluminum we have only begun to research and published nothing. Mostly worked on sulfur and the relevant comparison is that just as Robock said [referring to sulfur particle number studies mentioned by Alan Robock]. The whole thing he just got through was particle numbers, the impact of particle numbers. But we haven’t done anything on aluminum. So if we add onto the tropo aerosols, could we have any impact? That was totally irrelevant. That was just on particle numbers. But we haven’t done anything serious on aluminum and so there could be something terrible that we will find tomorrow that we haven’t looked at.

The U.S. should drop 20 million metric tons per anum of aluminum reflective material across the fruited plain the cool the planet, climate scientists have suggested.

— David Tulis is host of Nooganomics.com at Hot News Talk Radio 1240 910 and 1190 AM 1 to 3 p.m. weekdays, covering local economy and free markets in Chattanooga and beyond.

Sources: Brian Spencer and Jonathan O’Callaghan, “Are we playing God with Earth? Scientist admits he is ‘terrified’ of the technology being developed to stop global warming,” Dailymail.co.uk, Nov. 25, 2014

Damian Carrington, “Reflecting sunlight into space has terrifying consequences, say scientists,” Theguardian.com, Nov. 27, 2014

Tennessee death statistics, August 2014

Matt McGrath, “Geoengineering plan could have ‘unintended’ side effect,” BBC.com, Jan. 7, 2014

Andy Coughlan, “Geoengineering the planet: first experiments take shape,” Nov. 27, 2014, Newscientist.com

David Shukman (science editor), “Geo-engineering: Climate fixes ‘could harm billions’,” BBC.com, Nov. 25, 2014

Dane Wigington, “Alzheimer’s Association Refuses To Allow GeoEngineeringWatch.org To Sponsor Their Event,” Geoengineeringwatch.org, Oct. 15, 2014

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