City gets taste of ‘negative emissions’ as scientists debate solar radiation controls

print
A fresh aerial cancer of artificial clouds get an early start Jan. 5 in the Chattanooga area, as seen from my hilltop in Soddy-Daisy, in North Hamilton County.

A fresh aerial cancer of artificial clouds get an early start Jan. 5 in the Chattanooga area, as seen from my hilltop in Soddy-Daisy, in North Hamilton County. (Photo David Tulis) 

My early morning walk off my hilltop in Soddy-Daisy is marked by policy doodles that are part of the American war against global warming. (Photo David Tulis)

My early morning walk off my hilltop in Soddy-Daisy is marked by policy doodles that are part of the American war against global warming. (Photo David Tulis) 

One persistent contrail differs from a speeding  neighbor’s. Why? It is reported that a variety of negative emissions are used by the U.S. stratospheric aerosol geoengineering program. (Photo David Tulis)

A persistent contrail differs from a speeding neighbor’s. Why? It is reported that a variety of negative emissions are used by the U.S. stratospheric aerosol geoengineering program. (Photo David Tulis) 

Today’s stricken sky begins early in Chattanooga as seen from North Hamilton County. (Photo David Tulis)

Today’s stricken sky begins early in Chattanooga as seen from North Hamilton County. (Photo David Tulis) 

The sun sets behind a billboard in Hixson after an intense day of Chattanooga jet flyovers that carpet the city with aerosol mists. (Photo David Tulis)

The sun sets behind a billboard in Hixson under a sky clawed with jet trails that dissolve into a generalized haze. Sunset was brilliant, thanks to aerosol particulates that act the same way as dust in the slanting rays. (Photo David Tulis)

By David Tulis

Jets in the upper atmosphere this morning over Chattanooga lay in the sky a hazebank that drifted with the weather northeast toward Cleveland, Tenn. Yet, as these stripes on the east side of the city slowly drifted toward Bradley County, a yellow hazebank enveloped the horizon from the South.

If indeed this cloud cover originated from jet aircraft, it was deposited southeast of Chattanooga.

I often observe Chattanooga solar radiation management days begin east of the city against the rising sun. Then, routinely, as the day wears on, much of the sky east, south and west of Chattanooga is beclouded. Jet traffic across the skies of Chattanooga was intense much of the day, according to my repeated observation of the sky before and after my show at Hot News Talk Radio 1240 910 and 1190 AM in Hixson.

Jan. 4, the Lord’s Day, was marked by dramatic weather, with great systems of clouds through which the sun pierced intermittently. Jet streaks were evident among the gaps in the darkened masses of cloud.

Conference focuses on negative emissions

The activities of a routine day of sky hacking over the city are the object of study in many scientific groups around the world that are debating whether sky striping might be a good idea in light of “anthropogenic global warming,” or manmade rising in global temperatures.

A conference March 12 to 14 at the University of Cambridge will examine the prospect of solar radiation management such as we experienced today in Southeast Tennessee.

“Solar Radiation Management (SRM) has been proposed as a form of climate engineering that could be rapidly deployed to reduce global mean temperatures,” says a blurb for SRM Science 2015— Engineering the Climate. “SRM techniques include stratospheric aerosols, cloud brightening, space-based reflectors and surface albedo enhancement. These techniques attempt to offset some of the effects of increasing greenhouse gases, namely by reducing absorption of solar radiation.” (http://www.srms-cambridge.eng.cam.ac.uk/aboutsrm)

The text goes on to state a familiar warming to offered by backers of what an early U.S. military manual calls chemtrails. “SRM does not address the root cause of climate change, and does not eliminate the urgent need to reduce global carbon dioxide emissions. Apart from the scientific uncertainty surrounding SRM, there are ethical, political and social issues that also need to be addressed.”

The conference will lay aside topics that are in the direction of suppression of human industry, transportation and life — or Plan A for governments and the deep states behind them. It will focus on SRM and its potential for abuse (warfare, market manipulation in agriculture and weather futures), its creation of unintended weather consequences (extreme weather, droughts, floods, bizarre freezes, the exploding methane crisis at the poles) and possible health problems of aerosol particulates.

“Are climate engineering approaches fatally prone to error and misuse,” the conference organizers state, “and worth excluding from the climate conversation on both practical and moral grounds? Are they an emergency measure which could have far-reaching and unpredictable consequences if deployed? Could they be a relatively straightforward remedy for some of the consequences of climate change? And how should research aimed at these questions be regulated?”

Because in the ramping up of weather control in the 1960s was cast by industry upon the military for liability reasons, the U.S. government operates a monopoly on the practice and applied science of solar radiation management. The academicians meeting in Cambridge are working in a highly abstracted field that relies heavily on computer models. “The primary purpose of the conference is to provide a forum for scientists and engineers to present and discuss recent research results in a manner that is comprehensible to all participants.”

Organizers propose a reduction “to near zero” of carbon dioxide (which every person creates in exhaling). Given that depopulation and deindustrialization may be hard to attain, given people like you and your likely resistance, the necessity is to create counterpollutants. To undo perceived damage to the sky caused by 10 gigatons of carbon pollution created yearly by humankind, the group says, will be a huge task. The job “assumes large-scale deployment of negative emissions technologies in addition to rapid investment in mitigation and widespread use of bio-energy.”

A similar conference was held in Berlin in August “to discuss the highly complex and interlinked ethical, social and technical issues that come into focus when discussing climate engineering.”

Climate engineering already is putting into the air in Chattanooga toxic elements that are outside the scope of regulatory authority of the EPA, according to details provided by Bob Colby of the Chattanooga/Hamilton County Pollution Control Bureau. The unstoppable toxic brew starts with aluminum, strontium and barium, key ingredients in geoengineering and jet-spray patents. Scientists in the field seem to largely ignore the prospect of neurological damage that these inhaled ingredients might cause to downwind populations of aerial deposits.

Heavily ulcerated sky over Chattanooga Dec. 31, 2014

This sky over Northgate mall in north Chattanooga Dec. 31, 2014, strikes me as polluted. What is the source? (Photo David Tulis)

This sky over Northgate mall in north Chattanooga Dec. 31, 2014, is polluted. Visible are many jet trails laying down manmade particulate intended to combat global warming (and serve other state purposes) outside general knowledge of the American public. (Photo David Tulis)

The last day of 2014, Dec. 31, begins with a heavy dose of high-altitude particulate to help dim today's great villain, the sun. Might a dim sun affect human health in reduced vitamin D absorption? (Photo David Tulis)

The last day of 2014, Dec. 31, begins with a heavy dose of high-altitude particulate to help dim today’s great villain, the sun. Might a dim sun affect human health in reduced vitamin D absorption? (Photo David Tulis)

Often, Chattanooga sky treatments start early in the day on the east side of the city. (Photo David Tulis)

Often, Chattanooga sky treatments start early in the day on the east side of the city. (Photo David Tulis)

Leave a Reply