What it means to divest nationally, invest locally

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Work proceeds at my radio station's tower in Soddy-Daisy. Hot News Talk Radio is offering local investors a chance to profitably bring our free market perspective to a broader audience. (Photo David Tulis)

Work proceeds at my radio station’s tower in Soddy-Daisy. Hot News Talk Radio is offering local investors a chance to profitably bring our free market perspective to a broader audience. (Photo David Tulis)

By David Tulis

Our argument to reduce exposure to national economy and the vagaries of credit creation, central banks and Uncle Sam implies more capital for local economy. If you reduce your exposure to the stock market, mutual funds and the financial sector, you become someone looking for new spots at which to park your money. Or people nearer to home in whom you might invest.

Investors in the national economy are putting their faith in people, too, though they think they are investing in big companies whose names everyone recognizes. But in fact these Americans are placing their capital in individual men and women who run these publicly listed companies and whose stories and promises are part of the national narrative. To invest in a national market or company, we invest in strangers and the stories they have told about them in the annual reports and in the Wall Street Journal. We invest in people abstracted, in American free enterprise, in the world’s great economic engine, in the United States, as it were.

The idea of local economy is that, over time, we shift our perspective from Wall Street to Main Street, to invest in people nearer to us than New York. Investing in the local economy means putting your capital to work in a restaurant in the North Shore, a shop in Ooltewah, a factory in Soddy-Daisy or a programming studio at Lamp Post Group. Savings, in contrast, puts capital aside for your use, and is not working in local economy. Savings are different because they are not used in the application of labor to natural resources, which is a simple definition of capitalism or the marketplace.

Savings are one thing, investing is another. Investing puts your capital at risk, but with the prospect of INCREASE. Investment gives you the prospect of profit and increase (upon which you tithe); savings puts liquidity into reserve, and keeps capital in a holding pattern (usually awaiting some kind of disaster, need or future investment). Savings generate no gain, and you don’t tithe on them.

I tell people investing in my radio station that the funds they remit bear the risk of uncertainty and loss.

But it is also understood that the investor enjoys confidence in our eventual gain. He invests in a hope of our using his money to serve a market for four-way profit — for listeners at the radio station, advertisers, owners and investors.

My company is a constitutionally protected enterprise, a member of the Tennessee free press, seeking profit from public service and operated with “goodwill, good faith, hard work, determination, Christian witness and principles of honesty and forthrightness,” I tell my investor as I thank him for the check.

Again, the investor knows that no enterprise, no matter how skillfully run or well intentioned, can guarantee a profit, as profit ultimately resides in the providence of God, which is unknowable. But within the framework of property rights and the free market in which Hot News Talk Radio LLC operates, the investor knows that he can reasonably expect to profit 15 percent in two years on his gracious investment. If a caring and loving God blesses this labor, the station owners reserve the right to restore these funds in less than two years, and to a greater amount than 15 percent.

Time to act?

I am excited about the radio field after having spent 24 years as a newspaper editor in downtown Chattanooga. I enter radio rich in experience. My company is small, runs a remarkably lean operation in North Chattanooga and Soddy-Daisy, and has put into the media mix in my hometown an aggressive free market and localist argument. I believe our argument for local economy and free markets will become increasingly popular and profitable, especially as debt and crony capitalism bring crises and disaster to the wider economy.

Act now to profit with me in this work. Act today to take part in the ideas we have developed. Take a bold step today to join me in support of a liberty-minded station. We shortly will be using the radio signal to leverage half-price deals for our listeners and station website visitors. We promise a modest return in two years or less, and would be glad to speak with you about local economy and the part you could play in capitalizing us during our startup phase.

My home office number is at the bottom of the “about me” page at Nooganomics.com. Call me today so we can talk. Take advantage of me.

Encourage independent media by supporting this website and Hot News Talk Radio 1240 910 1190 AM — on the real airwaves in Chattanooga, on your smartphone via the TuneIn radio app, or online at Hotnewstalkradio.com. You support me first by supporting my advertisers and telling them you love and appreciate Hot News Talk Radio. You support me also by advertising your business or church on my three-city all-talk network. On this site, buy me a coffee at the tip jar.

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