U.S. sky stripe program boosted by huge coal ash sector

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North Carolina Fox TV reporter Julie Grant holds a jar of coal fly ash in a concrete manufacturing plant.

North Carolina Fox TV reporter Julie Grant holds a jar of coal fly ash in a concrete manufacturing plant.

A jet plume reaching from Soddy-Daisy to west Chattanooga becomes cloud cover Oct. 8, a major spray day in four Tennessee cities. (Photo David Tulis)

Coal fly ash deposited by a jet converts from a dense plume into a cloud reaching from Soddy-Daisy to west Chattanooga on Oct. 8, 2015, a major but routine spray day in four Tennessee cities. (Photo David Tulis)

By David Tulis

Coal fly ash is a fine particulate matter that looks and feels like talcum powder and can be a tan or gray color.

It is produced by coal-fired steam plants in Tennessee and around the country, and while it is waste and trash and leftovers, it is viewed as a product and a recyclable.

According to a controversial new paper, coal fly ash is the material used by the U.S. government in an off-budget and off-the-books program to  defeat what it declares is a global warming threat caused by highways, industry and human populations.

Dr. J. Marvin Herndon says that tests of rainfall from heavily sky striped areas show the particulate matter deposited by myriad jet overflights is utility waste especially suited for use in artificial cloud making and weather modification.

“Using [coal combustion products] rather than disposing of them conserves natural resources, reduces greenhouse gas emissions, and saves taxpayers significant costs,” says the American Coal Ash Association on its website.

Industry published material I reviewed Wednesday make no mention of coal ash “product” being used by the U.S. stratospheric aerosol geoengineering program. That official program dispersing a sanctioned form of pollution theoretically could reduce global warming, but data strongly suggests the global program by nation-states of many kinds is bringing neurological damage to human populations below, increasing planet surface temperatures and causing extreme weather events such as the California drought and the South Carolina flood.

Tonnage in millions

In 2007 the energy industry produced about 131 million tons of coal combustion waste.

Since the 1940s, an industry now worth billions has “risen from the ashes” when the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation began using concrete made with fly ash to build dams.

Coal waste is used today in a wide variety of building materials and engineered composite materials such as metal alloys and plastics.

In 2012 and 2013, TVA marketed 2.3 million tons of dry coal byproducts, “putting them to good use for a better tomorrow,” according to its website.

Dry coal ash — a term that includes light fly ash and heavier bottom ash —  has a wide variety of in the construction industry. Since the 1980s, coal ash has been a popular ingredient of cement. It can also be used to make synthetic gypsum for wallboard, roofing shingles, ceiling tiles and other building materials. It also finds its way into other products, including bowling balls, tool handles, utility poles and marine pilings.

“There’s probably coal ash in the wallboard in your home,” says John Ward, spokesman for the American Coal Ash Association. The recycling of coal ash rose from just under 30 percent in 2000 to 44.5 percent within eight years.

“But after the 2008 Kingston spill, when EPA revisited whether coal ash was hazardous, that made everyone in the industry nervous. EPA took six years to resolve this, and during that time, recycling markets languished. Now we can move forward again, with regulatory certainty again,” he said.

Coal fly ash is used in the U.S. government’s official air pollution program, that of sky striping or stratospheric aerosol geoengineering.

Coal fly ash is used in the U.S. government’s official air pollution program, that of sky striping or stratospheric aerosol geoengineering. Treated skies often take a brown hue, like that if this handful of product.

“When EPA reaffirmed coal ash as nonhazardous, the interest in reusing ash spiked — and this will continue,” says Catherine Butler, a spokeswoman for Duke Energy.

Utilities produced 53.4 million tons of coal fly ash in 2013, with about 23 million tons of it used in various industries. Twelve million tons is used in concrete, according the the American Coal Ash Association.

While coal fly ash is a waste product, sellers are paid for it. Concrete quality fly ash sells for F$20 to F$45 a ton, says a trade group, citing 2003 data.

Hidden threat

What does fly ash have to do with local economy and free markets? In short, that the U.S. government is altering the weather by injecting into the atmosphere a waste product that damages health, affects the weather, poisons the land and violates the U.S. clean air act. The story of weather modification that creates droughts in one part of the country, pleasant weather for a papal visit to Washington and “500-year storms” in flooded South Carolina is national, but also affects local Chattanooga residents and those in Southeast Tennessee.

Our report on J. Marvin Herndon’s research into stratospheric aerosol geoengineering — sky striping or “chemtrailing” — indicates the U.S. deep state, in its off-the-books program of weather modification and “albedo enhancement,” is using coal fly ash without telling members of the public about its emissions.

Coal fly ash trade groups tell about the heavy metals in coal waste, including arsenic, boron, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, selenium and zinc. The ACAA doesn’t mention aluminum in its coal ash FAQ. That element is the most dangerous, Dr. Herndon says. His scientific papers on sky striping and its negative health effects is creating a stir among defenders of the official storyline on chemical adjustments of the weather. That narrative established at the universities is that research is needed into weather modification and sky striping, and that nothing has been done yet to “fight global warming” by jet emissions of aerosolized particulate materials.

My survey of industry websites gives no clue as to the government’s reuse of coal ash as a material dispersed to weaken sunlight and alter weather patterns with highly water-absorbent and light-deflecting particles.

Altogether now: 4 Tennessee cities treated

Jets emitting cloud cover thronged the skies Thursday of major cities in Chattanooga in a concentrated effort to blank the sky. Photos from sky watchers in Nashville, Knoxville, Bristol and Chattanooga indicate the authorities scheduled mass overflights to alter the weather.

All the evidence of stratospheric aerosol geoengineering nearby are from Thursday, Oct. 8, 2015.

Treatments by my record have so far been sporadic for Chattanooga — Oct. 3, 4 and yesterday, Oct. 8.

Coal fly ash production has declined in recent years. (Graphic American Coal Ash Association)

Coal fly ash production has declined in recent years. (Graphic American Coal Ash Association)

Jets muck up the sky over Knoxville Oct. 8, 2015, a heavy aerosol injection day in at least four Tennessee cities. (Photo Marla Stair-Wood)

Jets muck up the sky over Knoxville Oct. 8, 2015, a heavy aerosol injection day in at least four Tennessee cities. (Photo Marla Stair-Wood)

Knoxville breathes easy Thursday under aerosol injections that one scientist, in a study of San Diego, says is coal fly ash. “The necessity for daily aerosol emplacement stems from the relatively low spraying-altitudes in the troposphere where mixing with air readily occurs bringing down the aerosolized particulates and exposing humanity and Earth’s biota to the fine-grained substance,“ his paper says. (Photo Marla Stair-Wood)

Knoxville breathes easy Thursday under aerosol injections that one scientist, in a study of San Diego, says is coal fly ash. “The necessity for daily aerosol emplacement stems from the relatively low spraying-altitudes in the troposphere where mixing with air readily occurs bringing down the aerosolized particulates and exposing humanity and Earth’s biota to the fine-grained substance,“ his paper says. (Photo Marla Stair-Wood)

A “chemtrail” goes about its quiet work blighting the sky to serve federal policy interests. Coal fly ash continues to find new uses. (Photo David Tulis)

A “chemtrail” goes about its quiet work blighting the sky to serve federal policy interests. Coal fly ash continues to find new uses. (Photo David Tulis)

Toxic skies over Nashville as seen by a musician on his way to work Thursday. (Photo Brian Mac)

Toxic skies over Nashville as seen by a musician on his way to work Thursday. (Photo Brian Mac)

Nashville after at least an hour of sky striping by “the good people.” (Photo Brian Mac)

Nashville after at least an hour of sky striping by “the good people.” (Photo Brian Mac)

“[C]oal fly ash is one major global waste product stream with the appropriate grain-size distribution for aerosolized tropospheric spraying that is readily available at extremely low cost and with existent processing and transport infrastructure,“ a scientist says, and the Hixson area of Chattanooga cannot say no. (Photo David Tulis)

“[C]oal fly ash is one major global waste product stream with the appropriate grain-size distribution for aerosolized tropospheric spraying that is readily available at extremely low cost and with existent processing and transport infrastructure,“ a scientist says, and the Hixson area of Chattanooga cannot say no. (Photo David Tulis)

A jet leaves an apparent contrail over Soddy-Daisy, Tenn., while one having passed previously leaves a bit of coal waste product at the start of a day’s work. (Photo David Tulis)

A jet leaves an apparent contrail over Soddy-Daisy, Tenn., while one having passed previously leaves a bit of coal waste product at the start of a day’s work. (Photo David Tulis)

Coal dust is usually sequestered in mud ponds, but here it is sprayed Oct. 8, 2015, over Bristol, Tenn. (Photo Geoengineering our Tennessee Skies)

Coal dust is usually sequestered in mud ponds, but here it is sprayed Oct. 8, 2015, over Bristol, Tenn. (Photo Geoengineering our Tennessee Skies)

Coal fly ash, said to be injected into the air, brings aluminum in active form, strontium and barium to the people of Knoxville. (Photo Marla Stair-Wood)

Coal fly ash, said to be injected into the air, brings aluminum in active form, strontium and barium to the people of Knoxville. (Photo Marla Stair-Wood)

A breathtaking aeriel visitation Thursday, Oct. 8, 2015, involves Tennessee’s major cities, including Chattanooga, Bristol, Nashville and, as seen here, Knoxville. (Photo Marla Stair-Wood)

A breathtaking aeriel visitation Thursday, Oct. 8, 2015, involves Tennessee’s major cities, including Chattanooga, Bristol, Nashville and, as seen here, Knoxville. (Photo Marla Stair-Wood)

Bristol, Tenn., might be glad to learn the following from geoscientists J. Marvin Herndon: “Like a fingerprint, the 8-element ratios of the San Diego rainwater extract of the tropospheric-emplaced particulate matter match element-by-element the laboratory water extract of coal fly ash within the range of observations.” (Photo Geoengineering our Tennessee Skies)

Bristol, Tenn., might be glad to learn the following from geoscientists J. Marvin Herndon: “Like a fingerprint, the 8-element ratios of the San Diego rainwater extract of the tropospheric-emplaced particulate matter match element-by-element the laboratory water extract of coal fly ash within the range of observations.” (Photo Geoengineering our Tennessee Skies)

Natural cloud formation over Soddy-Daisy, Tenn.? Maybe, if we could only be so blessed. (Photo David Tulis)

Natural cloud formation over Soddy-Daisy, Tenn.? Maybe, if we could only be so blessed. (Photo David Tulis)

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Sources: TVA, “New Uses for Coal Byproducts,” undated press release, https://www.tva.com/Energy/Our-Power-System/Fossil-Fuel-Generation/New-Uses-for-Coal-Byproducts

Sye McCraven, “The Future of Flay Ash Use in Concrete,” Oct. 28, 2013, National Precast Concrete Association, http://precast.org/2013/10/future-fly-ash-use-concrete/

Amy Graham, “A new day for coal ash recycling,” Aug. 11, 2014, Energybiz.com, http://www.energybiz.com/article/15/08/new-day-coal-ash-recycling

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