As Paris touts clean, polluting U.S. jets scar skies of 4 Tenn. cities

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Chattanooga is bombarded by aerosols early Sunday as trust remains an issue in Paris green talks. (Photo Blacky Darr)

Chattanooga is bombarded by aerosols early Sunday as trust remains an issue in Paris green talks. (Photo Blacky Darr)

On Sunday jets scrawled their white signatures across the sky over Soddy-Daisy and other developed areas of the state. (Photo David Tulis)

On Sunday jets scrawled their white signatures across the sky over Soddy-Daisy and other developed areas of the state. Aerosol deposits are called “negative emissions” and allow the U.S. government to pollute the air without consequence. (Photo David Tulis)

These trails over Bristol, Tenn., mark a day of intense stratospheric aerosol geoengineering in Tennessee. (Photo P.A. Hawk)

These trails over Bristol, Tenn., mark a day of intense stratospheric aerosol geoengineering in Tennessee. (Photo P.A. Hawk)

Aerosol deposits muck up the sky Sunday in Knoxville, Tenn. (Photo Marla Stair-Wood)

Aerosol deposits muck up the sky Sunday in Knoxville, Tenn. (Photo Marla Stair-Wood)

Tennessee’s capital city, Nashville, is subjected to an outpouring of aerosols in the nature of coal fly ash, the material discovered to be the center of the so-called “chemtrail” program of the U.S. government. (Photo Brian Mac)

Tennessee’s capital city, Nashville, is subjected to an outpouring of aerosols in the nature of coal fly ash, the material discovered to be the center of the so-called “chemtrail” program of the U.S. government. (Photo Brian Mac)

A jet streaks over Nashville on Sunday, with the photographer pointing out that its output of cloud is inconsistent with a condensation trail, or contrail. (Photo Brian Mac)

A jet streaks over Nashville on Sunday, with the photographer pointing out that its output of cloud is inconsistent with a condensation trail, or contrail. (Photo Brian Mac)

Noxious skies over Knox County this Sunday, a day in which several Tennessee cities were hazed out by jet sky stripes. (Photo Marla Stair-Wood)

Noxious skies over Knox County this Sunday, a day in which several Tennessee cities were hazed out by jet sky stripes. (Photo Marla Stair-Wood)

That Tenesseeans see skies such as this one over Bristol on Sunday and file no complaints with authorities is remarkable. (Photo P.A. Hawk)

That Tenesseeans see skies such as this one over Bristol on Sunday and file no complaints with authorities is remarkable. (Photo P.A. Hawk)

Chattanooga is treated by jet emissions Dec. 2, a Tuesday, during which much of the afternoon the sky over the city is hidden under a sky tray, the straight edge is seen in this photo. The line dissolved in the early evening. (Photo David Tulis)

Chattanooga is treated by jet emissions Dec. 2, a Tuesday, during which much of the afternoon the sky over the city is hidden under a sky tray, the straight edge is seen in this photo. The line dissolved in the early evening. (Photo David Tulis)

Intentional cloud-making emissions are not subject to negotiations in Paris. (Photo Matt Landman)

Intentional cloud-making emissions are not subject to negotiations in Paris. (Photo Matt Landman)

The U.S., which wants to avoid binding emissions targets, is backing mandatory standards of transparency in Paris talks concluding this week. But the U.S.' official pollution program is not part of negotiations. (Photo Facebook)

The U.S., which wants to avoid binding emissions targets, is backing mandatory standards of transparency in Paris talks concluding this week. But the U.S.’ official pollution program is not part of negotiations. (Photo Facebook)

Jets dump coal fly ash aloft even though  sun-reflecting cloud cover already blankets the earth below. Chemtrails are a dessicant and dry of storm systems. (Photo Geoengingeeringwatchorg)

Jets dump coal fly ash aloft even though sun-reflecting cloud cover already blankets the earth below. Chemtrails are a dessicant and dry of storm systems. (Photo Geoengingeeringwatchorg)

A sky over Sodd-Daisy on Nov. 11, 2015. (Photo David Tulis)

A sky over Soddy-Daisy, Tenn., on Nov. 11, 2015. (Photo David Tulis)

Aerosol deposits like these over Bristol, Tenn., may contribute to global warming because they do not let reflective heat leave the earth's surface, which ordinarily happens overnight. (Photo Geoengineering our Tennessee Skies on Facebook)

Aerosol deposits like these over Bristol, Tenn., may contribute to global warming because they do not let reflective heat leave the earth’s surface, which ordinarily happens overnight. Observers say artificial clouds blankets work to trap heat and elevate surface temps. (Photo Geoengineering our Tennessee Skies on Facebook)

Aerosol geoengineering is debated in a federal paper Climate Intervention: Reflecting Sunlight to Cool Earth, which carefully proposes a mass chemtrail program to alter planetary weather. (Photo Facebook)

Aerosol geoengineering is debated in a federal paper Climate Intervention: Reflecting Sunlight to Cool Earth, which carefully proposes a mass chemtrail program to alter planetary weather. The book appeared in March. (Photo Facebook)

By David Tulis

Jets streaked across the skies over Chattanooga and Hamilton County on Sunday morning, emitting plume tails that morphed into cloud cover.

The material is as fine as baby powder, and its nature is no longer a mystery as a concerned scientist, Dr. Raymond Herndon, has found it to be coal fly ash, a waste product from electricity-generating plants such as those run by TVA.

Nashville, Knoxville and Bristol also were dimmed, according to skywatchers. The treatment over Chattanooga was typical.

The jets were in the east early this Lord’s Day morning, stretching huge swaths of plume in a southwesterly direction. Around 8:30 they appeared to be tattooed across the sky in several directions, and as some plumes began spreading into clouds, others were being laid. By lunchtime the blue sky had been replaced by clouds.

Jets laid their gauzy deposits high above an incoming weather system well before it arrived. Its appearance later in the day created a glowering, dark evening sky. But little or no rain fell on Chattanooga this Lord’s Day.

Aerosol geoengineering regularly dissipates rain-bearing weather systems over Hamilton County.

Enroute from Soddy-Daisy to Brainerd at 9:30 a.m. in Chattanooga proper, I was able to see 15 distinct streaks from my driver’s side window as my family members and I drove southward on state Highway 153.

Sunday was second day of solar radiation management so far this month. In November jets mucked over the Chattanooga sky nine out of 30 days.

The activity of cloud creation by a program of jet overflights is in its third year of accelerated schedule, by my rough count. For days the skies will be largely blue, and cloud cover quite natural. But when jets converge, bizarre and freakish cloud conditions pertain.

Pollution talks in Paris

Lengthy talks have been in progress in Paris regarding “climate change.” They are slated to end Friday. A big issue is how to trust whether governments will live up to their promises to reduce carbon emissions.

Environmentalist Dane Wigington of Geoengineeringwatch.org says the Paris event ignores a crucial cause of rising global temperatures. “There can be no legitimate discussion about the state of the climate without first and foremost addressing the geoengineering issue,” he says. “The planet is not just warming, it is being pushed into total meltdown. Any valid discussion of this fact must include the climate engineering factor.”

The Paris event is posturing by the international establishment while nation-states continue an off-the-books program of weather modification, Mr. Wigington says.

“An unfortunately large percentage of the anti-geoengineering community is in total denial of the completely verifiable extremely rapid warming of our biosphere,” he says.

The planet is heating up at a rate equal to 4 Hiroshima bombs per second. 2014 was the warmest year ever recorded. 2015 will break that record and 2016 will likely shatter the record yet again. Facts about global warming have nothing to do with Al Gore or carbon credits (both of which are scams). Rather, it is about reality and credibility. Both factors are essential pillars to stand on if the battle to expose and halt climate engineering is to be successful. The planet’s former energy balance and equilibrium has been radically altered from countless anthropogenic causes, with geoengineering at the top of the list.

Mr. Wigington says political establishments have used weather modification for decades to attain their ends. “Record drought disasters have occurred in every single country in the Middle East prior to the destabilization and toppling of these countries,” says the activist. “In other countries, record flooding was the gateway to U.S./NATO occupation.

The same pattern holds in many dozens of countries around the globe where there are now U.S. or NATO bases and boots on the ground. The U.S. ‘homeland’ is also a target of the ongoing weather warfare by its own military, the epic California drought is one example. Though the climate is indeed disintegrating as the planet warms from countless sources of anthropogenic damage, global geoengineering is the largest wrench in the works of all. Weather warfare has been used for decades to manipulate and control populations all over the globe.

Media coverage of the Paris talks overlook the existing program for what is boldly dubbed “solar radiation management. Even stories touching on the climate talks indirectly suggest no such program exists. Asks a headline Nov. 24, 2015, “Could blocking out the SUN stop global warming? Expert reveals the plan could ‘buy us time’ while we curb our emissions.”

“Engineer Hugh Hunt suggests that while blocking out the sun by spraying particles into the stratosphere won’t solve the CO2 problem, it could ‘buy us time’ to bring our emissions in line.”

Sources: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-3332195/Could-blocking-SUN-stop-global-warming-Expert-reveals-plan-buy-time-curb-emissions.html#ixzz3tdFVzFB3

Sunday deposits over Tennessee, Dec. 6, 2015

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