U.S. freely spews fly ash in climate war, but tightens controls in TVA waste stream

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A policy sky is built by redundant leavings from jet aircraft as part of a federal war against sunlight. Here, Chattanooga today (Dec. 12, 2015). (Photo Blacky Darr)

A policy sky is built today (Dec. 12, 2015) by redundant leavings from jet aircraft as part of a federal war against sunlight. (Photo Blacky Darr)

Mysterious trails crisscross over my house in Soddy-Daisy, Tenn., in a program. Scientist Alan Robock warns that mass sky striping would “ignificantly affect the radiation available for solar power systems — one of the prime alternate methods of generating clean energy.” (Photo David Tulis)

Mysterious trails crisscross over my house today in Soddy-Daisy, Tenn. Scientist Alan Robock warns that mass sky striping would “significantly affect the radiation available for solar power systems — one of the prime alternate methods of generating clean energy.” (Photo David Tulis)

The quiet work of altering weather and dimming the sun takes place today over East Tennessee. (Photo P.A. Hawk, Geoengineering our Tennessee Skies on Facebook)

The quiet work of altering weather and dimming the sun takes place today over East Tennessee. (Photo P.A. Hawk, Geoengineering our Tennessee Skies on Facebook. Please “like” this site. )

U.S. weather control efforts light up an evening sky in East Tennessee on Dec. 7. Worries one scientist, “Similarly, since scientists know that stratospheric aerosol injection, for example, might impact the ecosphere, do humans have a right to plow ahead regardless? There’s no global agency to require an environmental impact state - ment for geoengineering. ” (Photo Geoengineering our Tennessee Skies on Facebook)

U.S. weather control efforts light up an evening sky in East Tennessee on Dec. 7. Worries one scientist: “Similarly, since scientists know that stratospheric aerosol injection, for example, might impact the ecosphere, do humans have a right to plow ahead regardless? There’s no global agency to require an environmental impact statement for geoengineering.” (Photo Geoengineering our Tennessee Skies on Facebook)

Blessings of our federal caretakers, as seen from Soddy-Daisy, Tenn., on Dec. 5. (Photo David Tulis)

Blessings of our federal caretakers, as seen from Soddy-Daisy, Tenn., on Dec. 5. (Photo David Tulis)

By David Tulis / AM 1240 Hot News Talk Radio

Coal fly ash is unregulated as an official pollutant used to dim the sun in the U.S. war against global warming. The fine-as-talcum powder is spewed across the horizons to deflect sunlight as part of an ostensible war on global warming, a threat deemed more perilous to the nation than terrorism.

But on the ground coal ash fell under stronger federal controls in October. The rules were prompted by the 2008 collapse of a fly ash mud lake dam wall that collapsed near a TVA steam plant. It released 5.4 million cubic yards of sludge from a storage pond at the Tennessee Valley Authority’s Kingston Fossil Plant. The waste storage disaster of the Emory River damaged houses and cost F$1 billion to tidy.

Ghostly tracings

Today over Chattanooga the sky is full of tracings of fly ash deposits. The aerial program that dispenses the environmental treatments are obscured in an off-the-books ghostings of the skyways and large areas of the country. The program works in tandem with weather patterns, but also is understood to drastically alter the weather, a goal announced by President John F. Kennedy to the United Nations on Sept. 25, 1961.

It is the sixth day of so-called chemtrailing over the city. On Dec. 2, 5, 6, 10 and 11 the county was subjected efforts to dim sunlight reaching its buildings, tarmac streets, parking lots, rooftops, shopping malls and industrial areas such as those around Champion Tray along Manufacturers Road on the north bank of the Tennessee River.

“Unusually warm weather sticks around through the weekend with records highs possible,” says TV3 of today’s weather. “It’s shorts and t-shirt weather in December!” Temps today are 70 degrees, though the sun is weak, filtered through the smog. In midafternoon morning dew remains on the ground; geoengineering reduces evaporation rates, among other consequences.

Ground monitoring required

The new rules for industrial disposal of coal fly ash require closer monitoring of ash ponds and landfills. The rules also require limits on dust that flies up from coal ash fields on windy days.

“The rule is a weak rule,” says Lisa Evans, an attorney for the environmental watchdog group Earthjustice. “But it is a national rule that all utilities must comply with. This is a small step forward, and we’re better off than we were last year. But there’s a lot of work to be done.”

In 2009 TVA announced an eight-year plan to better control coal fly ash waste from its 11 coal-burning plants. TVA recycles about 40 percent of the ash and gypsum left from the burning and scrubbing of coal. The rest is stored in ash ponds or hauled to local landfills.
John Kammeyer, hired after the coal ash spill to handle ash disposal, said TVA wants to boost sales of ash and gypsum for use in wallboard, concrete and other products.

Coal fly ash contains ingredients that are dangerous to human health. Aluminum is a neurological disaster and is connected with autism and Alzheimer’s disease. Ash also contains strontium, barium and other elements that are deemed dangerous enough to be largely forbidden from entering the atmosphere by utility plant smokestacks.

But coal fly ash avoids the federal government from having to manufacture particles to be sent aloft as part of what is called solar radiation management or stratospheric aerosol geoengineering. It is light enough to stay aloft for some time, though whether the particles fall to earth in a day or a year appears in dispute.

Source: “TVA going dry for disposal of coal fly ash,” Aug. 10, 2009, Chattanooga Times Free Press. http://www.timesfreepress.com/news/news/story/2009/aug/10/tva-going-dry-disposal-coal-fly-ash/230216/

Alan Robock, “20 reasons why geoengineering may be a bad idea,” Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, May/June 2008. http://climate.envsci.rutgers.edu/pdf/20Reasons.pdf

A scene from the skies of Bristol, Tenn., Jan. 31, 2014. Policy trails, not contrails.

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