Bill would limit U.S. smog-producing program in skies of Rhode Island

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Chattanooga receives a treatment of jet-deposited aerosols Feb. 18, 2016. (Photo Blacky Darr)

Chattanooga receives a treatment of jet-deposited aerosols Feb. 18, 2016. (Photo Blacky Darr)

Knoxville is crisscrossed with jet plumes of a nighttime, Jan. 24, 2016. I have seen over the skies of Soddy-Daisy such interventions that are said to prevent radiative heat from the earth’s surface from escaping into space. (Photo Marla Stair-Wood)

Knoxville is crisscrossed with jet plumes of a nighttime, Jan. 24, 2016. I have seen over the skies of Soddy-Daisy such interventions that are said to prevent radiative heat from the earth’s surface from escaping into space. (Photo Marla Stair-Wood)

Treatments from unidentified jet aircraft muck up the sky over Chattanooga, as seen here from Soddy-Daisy Dec. 10, 2015. (Photo David Tulis)

Treatments from unidentified jet aircraft muck up the sky over Chattanooga, as seen here from Soddy-Daisy Dec. 10, 2015. (Photo David Tulis)

Animal, plant and human life are repeatedly jeopardized by stratospheric aerosol geoengineering, as seen here in Auburn, Calif. (Photo Kathy Sarmento)

Animal, plant and human life are repeatedly jeopardized by stratospheric aerosol geoengineering, as seen here in Auburn, Calif. (Photo Kathy Sarmento)

Sky striping is a form of state warfare against the populace of Northern Caifornia and other states. The state injects dust into the sky regardless of the Clean Air Act, under a classified claim of necessity. (Photo Larry Danley)

Sky striping is a form of state warfare against the populace of Northern Caifornia and other states. The state injects dust into the sky regardless of the Clean Air Act, under a classified claim of necessity. (Photo Larry Danley)

Chattanooga is treated periodically to a ginned-up blanket of airplane smog. (Photo Blacky Darr)

Chattanooga is treated periodically to a ginned-up blanket of airplane smog. (Photo Blacky Darr)

I have seen several jets over Chattanooga making solid-wing emissions such as these from an Air Canada 777. (Photo Owen Gunn, Chemtrails Global Skywatch)

I have seen several jets over Chattanooga making solid-wing emissions such as these from an Air Canada 777. (Photo Owen Gunn, Chemtrails Global Skywatch)

The U.S. sky management program often deploys assets over Tennessee cities on the same day. Here, a scene from East Tennessee. (Photo P.A. Hawk, Geoengineering Our Tennessee Skies on Facebook)

The U.S. sky management program often deploys assets over Tennessee cities on the same day. Here, a scene from East Tennessee repeated in Chattanooga, Knoxville and Nashville. (Photo P.A. Hawk, Geoengineering Our Tennessee Skies on Facebook)

One or two Tennesseans are concerned about scenes such as this one comprising evidence of a public health menace served upon the people by the national government in Washington, D.C. (Photo Tennessee Skywatch)

One or two Tennesseans are concerned about scenes such as this one comprising evidence of a public health menace served upon Tennesseans by the national government in Washington, D.C. (with the complicity of Nashville). (Photo Tennessee Skywatch)

A ghostly film over my house in Soddy-Daisy, Tenn. (Photo David Tulis)

A ghostly film over my house in Soddy-Daisy, Tenn. (Photo David Tulis)

Manmade clouds over Soddy-Daisy intermingled with others laid about by aircraft Feb. 18, 2016. (Photo David Tulis)

Manmade clouds over Soddy-Daisy intermingled with others laid jets Feb. 18, 2016. (Photo David Tulis)

The clear skies of Switzerland and its pristine snowy peaks are often polluted by sky striping. (Photo Steven Fourcade)

The clear skies of Switzerland and its pristine snowy peaks are often polluted by sky striping. (Photo Steven Fourcade)

If dirty drinking water and government incompetence weren’t enough, Intense sky striping afflicts Flint, Mich. (Photo Geoffrey Taylor, Chemtrails Global Skywatch)

If dirty drinking water and government incompetence weren’t enough, intense sky striping afflicts Flint, Mich. (Photo Geoffrey Taylor, Chemtrails Global Skywatch)

Emissions of aluminum and other metals in the coal fly ash create brilliant effects on the skyline of San Francisco. (Photo Patrick Roddie))

Emissions of aluminum and other metals in the coal fly ash create brilliant effects on the skyline of San Francisco. (Photo Patrick Roddie)

A bill before the Rhode Island general assembly proposes that the “air contaminants” of the U.S. sky striping program be regulated as a health hazard affecting the state’s people and economy.

By David Tulis

The bill says that “[s]olar radiation management and climate geoengineering research [are] in an extremely early stage” but that “foreseeable hazards” put citizens in peril, including:

➤ “Decreased precipitation and evaporation, including alteration of monsoon patterns, and potentially delayed recovery of the ozone hole;

➤ “Producing reductions in regional rainfall that could rival those of past major droughts, leading to winners and losers among the human population and possible conflicts over water;

➤ “Reducing the total amount of direct sunlight reaching earth’s surface, which could reduce the effectiveness of solar energy systems;

Rep. Justin Price is a sponsor of the aerosol geoengineering bill in Rhode Island. (Photo state house)

Rep. Justin Price is a sponsor of the aerosol geoengineering bill in Rhode Island. (Photo state house)

➤ “Promoting an increase in acid rain loads from injection of sulfur, aluminum oxide particles, gases or other compounds, which would cause adverse impacts when such compounds eventually fall into the [troposphere] and ‘rain out’ onto the land and ocean, including impacts on forests, crops, built structures, and ocean ecosystems.”

Rep. Karen MacBeth

Rep. Karen MacBeth is targeting the U.S. sky striping program in Rhode Island. (Photo state house)

Rep. Karen MacBeth and Rep. Justin A. Price are sponsors of the Rhode Island chemtrail bill, H 7578.

State would clog U.S. nozzles

The bill proposes that the state gum up the works of the secretive national program that by my observation in the Chattanooga area was ramped up in 2013. The bill says that while solar radiation management “is a topic worthy for both scientific and other public investigation and debate,” the deployment of such a program would be “strictly regulated by the state.” That would allow a demand for environmental impact statements and “input and comment” from the public, scientists, lobbies and specialized groups.

The measure would lightly penalize anyone who engages in stratospheric or tropospheric geoengineering pollution. The bill includes the element of mens rea (guilty mind, or intent) and appears to make the offense an administrative one rather than one at common law.

Anyone who “knowingly engages in solar radiation management climate geoengineering *** or who knowingly fails to comply with the decision of the director shall be punished by a fine of not more than five hundred dollars ($500) or by imprisonment for not more than ninety (90) days.”

The bill would create a regulatory system for any entity that plans to plume the skies over the state. It involves obtaining permission and describing research and methods “to ensure that potential impacts are minimized.” The statement would conform to a U.S. national environmental policy act standard, require public hearings and finally obtain a grant by the state’s green boss, the director of the department of environmental management.

Chattanooga gets break

Tennessee is also bombarded  with “soot, cinders, ashes, dust, fumes, gas, aerosol particles” as they are described in the Rhode Island bill.

But sky striping over Chattanooga and Hamilton County, Tenn., eased in February, with  four days of aerial activity. Jets laid sun-dimming materials Feb. 3, 5, 18 and 29.

January treatments were more than double February’s. Jets occluded area skies Jan. 1, 2 , 3, 5, 11, 14, 19, 23, 25 and 27.

Conference explores sky striping

A conference being held in March in London will focus on the chief proposed way to alter the climate — that being the use of jet aircraft to create smog. Speakers will mention other methods, but the most practical and the cheapest is by jet carpet clouding.

The chief speaker is Alan Robock is a distinguished professor from the department of environmental sciences at Rutgers University and an editor for Reviews in Geophysics. His studies include nuclear winter, volcanic eruptions, climate and geoengineering. He has previously spoken in TED talks: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qsrEk1oZ-54. More about Professor Robock may be found on his website: climate.envsci.rutgers.edu/robock/robock_bio.html.

His presentation is titled “Smoke and Mirrors Not the Solution to Global Warming,” and he will talk about the current nation-state program of sky striping as if were a theoretical prospect in a hazy future. Will solar radiation management (SRM) best be served by injecting particles into the stratosphere, brightening clouds, or blocking sunlight with satellites between the sun and Earth?

If chemtrailing were ever to be devised and the prospect arrive of it being put into practice, Dr. Robock very likely would oppose it.

“If there were a way to continuously inject SO2 into the lower stratosphere,” according to the description of his lecture, “it would produce global cooling, stopping melting of the ice caps, and increasing the uptake of CO2 by plants. Although no systems to conduct stratospheric geoengineering now exist, a comparison of different proposed injection schemes, using airplanes, balloons, and artillery, shows that putting sulfur gases into the stratosphere would be inexpensive.”

References to fruity schemes to delivery smog particles aloft often are mentioned in the same breath as the obvious method, mass jet delivery.

“But there are at least 27 reasons why stratospheric geoengineering may be a bad idea,” Dr. Robock says. “These include disruption of the Asian and African summer monsoons, reducing precipitation to the food supply for billions of people; ozone depletion; no more blue skies; reduction of solar power; and rapid global warming if it stops. Furthermore, there are concerns about commercial or military control, and serious degradation of terrestrial astronomy and satellite remote sensing. Global efforts to reduce anthropogenic emissions (mitigation) and to adapt to climate change are a much better way to channel our resources.”

Source: http://www.rsc.org/events/detail/20243/geoengineering-the-climate

This brief video shows a remarkable sequence of aerosol dispersements from a jet, with narration by environmentalist Dane Wiggington of Geoengineeringwatch.org.

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