How can Pinkston prosecute without meeting 3 requirements for standing?

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Neal Pinkston, district attorney (Photo wdef.com)

Neal Pinkston, district attorney (Photo wdef.com)

The state is a religious corporation and a legal fiction that prosecutes criminal cases in its own name and person. It replaces the victims or survivors of crimes and acts as if it were the offended party, seeking redress for having been injured. David Tulis reveals the three requirements for standing that are generally held applicable to civil cases; but the state exempts itself from these requirements in criminal cases without any local attorneys insisting on the requirement, as does the Tenessee supreme court in Chattanooga v. Davis. Because the state has made itself front and center in seeking legal redress, it rejects God’s rule: God says the chief goal of justice is the rights of the victim and equity. One result of the modern state’s usurpation of God’s prerogatives is that Tennessee ignores God’s requirement for restitution for the victim and a personal connection between the criminal and the victim, the victim to be made the beneficiary of the criminal’s restitutionary acts. Gary North, a Christian economist and reconstructionist, explores these concepts in books such as Victim’s Rights. (Courtesy NoogaRadio 92.7)

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